Hume's Account Of Memory
McDonough (Jeffrey K.)
Source: British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Feb2002, Vol. 10 Issue 1, p71-87, 17p;
Paper - Abstract

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Philosophers Index Abstract

    This essay divides into three main sections. The first section isolates three puzzles in Hume's account of memory. The second section argues that while Hume's difficulties are exacerbated on the assumption that Hume held the causal thesis, they are reduced on the hypothesis that Hume did not fully appreciate the analytic connection between memory and causation1. Finally, the third section looks at how the reading of Hume's account of memory offered in the first two sections fits into the larger context of Hume's work by considering the roles Hume assigns the memory in his famous account of personal identity. Discusses philosopher David Hume's account of memory in his 'Treatise of Human Nature.' Isolation of puzzles in Hume's account of memory; Hypothesis that Hume did not fully appreciate the analytic connection between memory and causation2; Ways in which the reading of Hume's account of memory fits into the larger context of Hume's work; Roles that Hume assigns to memory in his account of personal identity.

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  1. Blue: Text by me; © Theo Todman, 2018
  2. Mauve: Text by correspondent(s) or other author(s); © the author(s)



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