Can God's Existence Be Disproved?
Findlay (J.N.)
Source: Flew & MacIntyre - New Essays in Philosophical Theology
Paper - Abstract

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    This article attempts to show that a necessity of existence is part and parcel of the concept of a god, if the latter is taken to be an object worthy of worship. For a being that might not have existed, and that only contingently possessed divine excellences, could never merit the absolute deference of worship. But if, as critics of the ontological proof have argued, existence can never be necessary, it follows that the whole concept of a god is incoherent, and that the existence of a god is not dubious, but impossible.

Comment:

Originally published in Mind, New Series, Vol. 57, No. 226 (Apr., 1948), pp. 176-183; hard copy filed in "Various - Heythrop Essays & Supporting Material (Boxes)".

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