Thesis - Chapter 09 (Arguments against the Constitution View)
Todman (Theo)
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Write-up2 (as at 13/01/2022 00:20:10): Thesis - Chapter 09 (Arguments against the Constitution View)

Abstract
  • A discussion of the arguments against the Constitution View, focusing on those mustered by the principal animalists, with a critique.
  • Additionally, I intend here to critique Olson’s “Thinking Animal” Argument3. While this is largely an argument for Animalism4, though I think it unnecessary to establish the case for Animalism, and this aspect is covered in Chapter 65, Olson uses it against the Constitution View, though it ‘works’ – if at all – against any alternative to Animalism.



Research Methodology
  • Follow this Link6 for a generic statement of how I intend to pursue each Chapter.
  • The method is broken down into 16, possibly iterative, stages, some of which have sub-stages.
  • Follow this Link7 for my progress dashboard on these tasks.



Chapter Introduction
  1. Unlike for the previous Chapter8, there is not so much a 1-1-match between this Chapter and a single Note – in this case Constitution View – Objections9. That’s because Olson’s Master Argument10 – which is both an argument for Animalism and an objection to the Constitution View – has its own Note. I imagine that this Chapter will be more focussed and less exploratory than either of these Notes.
  2. The Note on Holes & Smiles11 is relevant because they illustrate how a property – like the Cheshire Cat’s smile – cannot exist in the absence of the infrastructural body that makes it possible, nor can they be transferred from one body to another and remain the same property. So, I would argue, a FPP12 is the property of a particular human body, and cannot be transplanted from one body to another.



Links to Notes
  1. The Constitution View13. Excluded14
  2. Arguments against the Constitution View15
  3. Holes & Smiles16
  4. The Thinking Animal Argument17. Excluded18



Main Text
  1. The Constitution View19. Excluded20
  2. Arguments against the Constitution View21
    1. Text to be supplied.
  3. Holes & Smiles22
    1. Text to be supplied.
  4. The Thinking Animal Argument23. Excluded24



Concluding Remarks
  1. Having now discussed the arguments against both Animalism and the Constitution View, we now in our next Chapter25 turn to the question of Thought Experiments in general, and how they bear on this topic in particular.
  2. This is work in progress26.


Links to Books / Papers to be Addressed27
  1. This section attempts to derive the readings lists automatically from those of the underlying Notes, but removing duplicated references. The list is divided into:-
  2. I’ve not been overly careful to segregate the reading-list of this Chapter from that of Chapter 730. I will address the segregation in due course. There will, in any case, be some overlap.
  3. Many aspects of these papers will need to be either ignored or reserved for other chapters.



Works on this topic that I’ve actually read31, include the following:-
  1. Arguments against the Constitution View32
  2. Holes & Smiles37


A further reading list might start with:-
  1. Arguments against the Constitution View43
  2. Holes & Smiles45



In-Page Footnotes

Footnote 2:
  • This is the write-up as it was when this Abstract was last output, with text as at the timestamp indicated (13/01/2022 00:20:10).
  • Link to Latest Write-Up Note.
Footnotes 14, 20:
  • This Note will be excluded from the Reading List for this Chapter.
  • It is included in the Reading List for Chapter 7.
Footnotes 18, 24:
  • This Note will be excluded from the Reading List for this Chapter.
  • It is included in the Reading List for Chapter 6.
Footnote 27:
  • See the section on Research Methodology for what is to be done with these.
Footnote 39: Footnote 41:
  • See Draft Note.
  • Review Comments:–
    First Half,
    Second Half.
  • Olson mentions dents rather than holes, but a dent is a hole philosophically-speaking, it seems.
  • Topologically-speaking, a dent is a smile.
Footnote 42:
  • Simmias’s “tuning of the lyre” objection to the separable existence of souls. Thomas mentions the Cheshire Cat.
Footnote 44:
  • Argues against human uniqueness.
  • No doubt there are a number of other books of this ilk.
Footnote 46:
  • Mentions smiles and persons in Section G.

Text Colour Conventions (see disclaimer)

  1. Blue: Text by me; © Theo Todman, 2022



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