Personal Identity and the Phineas Gage Effect
Tobia (Kevin Patrick)
Source: Analysis, Volume 75, Issue 3, 1 July 2015, Pages 396–405
Paper - Abstract

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Author’s Abstract

  1. Phineas Gage’s story is typically offered as a paradigm example supporting the view that part of what matters for personal identity is a certain magnitude of similarity between earlier and later individuals.
  2. Yet, reconsidering a slight variant of Phineas Gage’s story indicates that it is not just magnitude of similarity, but also the direction of change that affects personal identity judgments; in some cases, changes for the worse are more seen as identity-severing than changes for the better of comparable magnitude.
  3. Ironically, thinking carefully about Phineas Gage’s story tells against the thesis it is typically taken to support.

Comment:

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