What’s So Simple About Personal Identity?
Farris (Joshua)
Source: Philosophy Now, Oct/Nov 2015
Paper - Abstract

Paper StatisticsColour-ConventionsDisclaimer


Author’s Abstract

  1. Materialists or physicalists are philosophers who believe that humans are completely physical beings, whereas dualists believe we are minds – sometimes souls – with bodies. Both materialists and dualists are very interested in the nature of personal identity. In the recent literature, there are four prominent basic views on it. The proponents of all these views want to answer the questions, ‘What is a person?’ and ‘How can we identify one?’. Other relevant questions include, ‘Who am I?’, ‘Who am I in certain contexts?’, and ‘Is there a fact of the matter to my being me?’
  2. Let’s look at the discussion over the so-called ‘simple’ view of personal identity. Simple views1 have commonly been associated with substance dualism (which I’ll explain later); yet lately, there is a new simple view2 that is a variant of materialism. In this article I wish to contrast these two views in the context of the broader debate on personal identity. The basic views of personal identity I discuss here are: the body view; the brain view; the memory/character continuity view; and the simple view3. Additionally, there is a new4 simple view5 called the not-so-simple simple view6. Defenders of both simple views7 largely agree in their estimate of the first three views, yet there are some important distinctions between the two simple views8, which deserve attention. (There are other views that I do not discuss here, such as the narrative view.)



In-Page Footnotes

Footnote 4: See "Baker (Lynne Rudder) - Personal Identity: A Not-So-Simple Simple View".


Text Colour Conventions (see disclaimer)

  1. Blue: Text by me; © Theo Todman, 2018
  2. Mauve: Text by correspondent(s) or other author(s); © the author(s)



© Theo Todman, June 2007 - Nov 2018. Please address any comments on this page to theo@theotodman.com. File output:
Website Maintenance Dashboard
Return to Top of this Page Return to Theo Todman's Philosophy Page Return to Theo Todman's Home Page