Philosophical Psychopathology
Graham (George) & Stephens (G. Lynn)
This Page provides (where held) the Abstract of the above Book and those of all the Papers contained in it.
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BOOK ABSTRACT:

Back Cover Blurb

  1. Philosophical Psychopathology1 is a benchmark volume for an emerging field where mental disorders serve as the springboard for philosophical insights.
  2. It brings together innovative, current research by Owen Flanagan, Robert Gordon, Robert Van Gulick, and others on mental disorders of consciousness, self-consciousness2, emotions, personality, and action and belief as well as general methodological questions about the study of mental disorder.
  3. Topics include the problem of despair, multiple personality disorder3, autism and the theory of the mind debate, and the effectiveness of psychotherapy.
  4. An extensive introduction shows how to interpret philosophical psychopathology4 as an interdisciplinary field and locates the contributions in the book conceptually and in terms of the surrounding literature. Psychopathology5 promises to clarify and illuminate a host of philosophical issues.
  5. The twelve chapters focus chiefly on issues in applied philosophy of mind (personal identity and self-consciousness6, voluntary action and self-control, cognition and practical reasoning), in the science of mind (the medical model of mental disorders, philosophy of science and psychiatry, psychopathology7 and folk psychology), and in the ethical and experiential dimensions of psychopathology8.



"Bach (Kent) - Emotional Disorder and Attention"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology


Philosophers Index Abstract
    Attention is generally commensurate with emotion, but in emotional disorder there is a disruptive disparity between the two, involving irrationality, loss of control, and distress. Some domain of experience may overly capture one's attention (obsessive disorder) or, alternatively, be trivialized and even escape one's attention altogether (repressive disorder). Specific types of each may be classified partly by the kind of emotion involved, e.g., worry, suspicion, fear, anger, or shame. Emotional health involves being able to manage one's attention, to bring things to mind when need be, and to keep things from intruding when they do not warrant consideration. The latter requires an effective use of "exclusionary categories", ways of categorizing actual and possible objects of attention so as to justify treating them as not worthy of attention.



"Erwin (Edward) - The Effectiveness of Psychotherapy: Epistemological Issues"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology



"Flanagan (Owen) - Multiple Identity, Character Transformation, and Self-Reclamation"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology



"Fulford (K.W.M.) - Value, Illness, and Failure of Action: Framework for a Philosophical Psychopathology of Delusions"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology



"Garrett (Brian) - The Problem of Despair"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology



"Gordon (Robert M.) & Barker (John A.) - Autism and the 'Theory of Mind' Debate"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology



"Graham (George) & Stephens (G. Lynn) - An Introduction to Philosophical Psychopathology: Its Nature, Scope, and Emergence"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology


Philosophers Index Abstract
    Surveys the topics and literature of the field of philosophical psychopathology1 with emphasis upon the field's most recent areas of activity.



"Graham (George) & Stephens (G. Lynn) - Mind and Mine"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology


Philosophers Index Abstract
    Examine introspective alienation as this phenomenon occurs in a variety of different psychopathological1 states or conditions. Distinguishes between two aspects of self- consciousness operative in such states or conditions. One is being conscious of one's own stream of consciousness; the other is being conscious of one's own mental agency.



"Grunbaum (Adolf) - The Placebo Concept in Medicine and Psychiatry"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology



"Heil (John) - Going to Pieces"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology



"Poland (Jeffrey), Von Eckardt (Barbara) & Spaulding (Will) - Problems with the DSM Approach to Classifying"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology



"Schoeman (Ferdinand) - Alcohol Addiction and Responsibility Attribution"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology



"Van Gulick (Robert) - Deficit Studies and the Function of Phenomenal Consciousness"

Source: Graham & Stephens - Philosophical Psychopathology



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  1. Blue: Text by me; © Theo Todman, 2018
  2. Mauve: Text by correspondent(s) or other author(s); © the author(s)



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