Metamorphosis and Identity
Bynum (Caroline)
This Page provides (where held) the Abstract of the above Book and those of all the Papers contained in it.
Colour-ConventionsDisclaimerBooks / Papers Citing this BookNotes Citing this Book

BOOK ABSTRACT:

Amazon Book Description1

  1. The four studies in this book center on the Western obsession with the nature of personal identity.
  2. Focusing on the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, but with an eye toward antiquity and the present, Caroline Walker Bynum explores the themes of metamorphosis2 and hybridity in genres ranging from poetry, folktales, and miracle collections to scholastic theology, devotional treatises, and works of natural philosophy.
  3. She argues that the obsession with boundary-crossing and otherness was an effort to delineate nature's regularities and to establish a strong sense of personal identity, extending even beyond the grave.
  4. She examines historical figures such as Marie de France, Gerald of Wales, Bernard Clairvaux, Thomas Aquinas, and Dante, as well as modern fabulists such as Angela Carter, as examples of solutions to the perennial question of how the individual can both change and remain constant.
  5. Addressing the fundamental question for historians – that of change – Bynum also explores the nature of history writing itself.
  6. Caroline Walker Bynum: is University Professor at Columbia University. She is the author of "Bynum (Caroline) - Resurrection of the Body in Western Christianity, 200 - 1336", and Fragmentation and Redemption: Essays on Gender and the Body in Medieval Religion (Zone Books, 1991).



In-Page Footnotes ("Bynum (Caroline) - Metamorphosis and Identity")

Footnote 1: This refers to the 2005 New Edition.


BOOK COMMENT:

Zone Books, New York, 2001



"Bynum (Caroline) - Change in the Middle Ages"

Source: Bynum - Metamorphosis and Identity, 2001, Introduction


Sections
  1. The Ulster Werewolves – 15
  2. Change: The Concept – 19
  3. Change and the Twelfth Century – 22
  4. Hybrid and Metamorphosis1 – 28
  5. Some Methodological Considerations – 33



"Bynum (Caroline) - Wonder"

Source: Bynum - Metamorphosis and Identity, 2001, Chapter 1


Sections
  1. Recent Scholarship on Wonder and Wonders – 40
  2. The Many Wonder Discourses of the Middle Ages – 42
  3. Theological and Philosophical Discussion – 48
  4. Admiratio in Devotional Literature – 51
  5. The Marvelous in Literature of Entertainment – 53
  6. The Range of Wonder Responses – 56
  7. Wonder and Significance – 69
  8. Wonder as Cognitive, Perspectival, and Non-appropriative – 72
  9. Wonder and the Modern Historian – 73



"Bynum (Caroline) - Metamorphosis, or Gerald and the Werewolf"

Source: Bynum - Metamorphosis and Identity, 2001, Chapter 2


Sections
  1. Again the Question of Bodily Change – 79
  2. Ovidian Poetry as Fascination with Change – 86
  3. Theological Speculation on Growth and Change – 89
  4. Werewolf Stories as Testing of Boundaries – 92
  5. The Ovid Reception as Enthusiasm for Order – 98
  6. Learned Theology and Miracle Stories as Ontological Control – 101
  7. Were Medieval Werewolves Really Metempsychosis? – 105
  8. Conclusion – 109



"Bynum (Caroline) - Monsters, Medians, and Marvelous Mixtures: Hybrids in the Spirituality of Bernard of Clairvaux"

Source: Bynum - Metamorphosis and Identity, 2001, Chapter 3


Sections
  1. Mixture and Monster – 117
  2. Similitude and Doubleness – 127
  3. Change and Unitas – 131
  4. Natural Philosophy as the Context of Bernard's Understanding – 144
  5. Twelfth-Century Religious Life as Context – 147
  6. Literature and Art as Context – 150
  7. Conclusion: Hybridity in the Spirituality of Bernard of Clairvaux – 158



"Bynum (Caroline) - Shape and Story"

Source: Bynum - Metamorphosis and Identity, 2001, Chapter 4


Sections
  1. The Problem of Personal Identity – 163
  2. Some Stories About Werewolves: Ovid's Lycaon – 166
  3. Some Stories About Werewolves: Marie de France's Bisclavret – 170
  4. Stories About Werewolves and Metamorphosis1: Angela Carter – 173
  5. Metamorphosis2 and Identity – 176
  6. Shape and Story, Body and Narrative – 180
  7. Metamorphosis3 in Dante – 182
  8. Conclusion – 187



"Bynum (Caroline) - Metamorphosis and Identity: Afterword"

Source: Bynum - Metamorphosis and Identity, 2001



Text Colour Conventions (see disclaimer)
  1. Blue: Text by me; © Theo Todman, 2018
  2. Mauve: Text by correspondent(s) or other author(s); © the author(s)



© Theo Todman, June 2007 - Oct 2018. Please address any comments on this page to theo@theotodman.com. File output:
Website Maintenance Dashboard
Return to Top of this Page Return to Theo Todman's Philosophy Page Return to Theo Todman's Home Page