The Life of the Cosmos
Smolin (Lee)
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BOOK ABSTRACT:

Amazon.com Review

  1. Lee Smolin is not afraid to think big – really, really big.
  2. His theory of cosmic evolution by the natural selection of black-hole universes makes what we can experience into an infinitesimal, yet crucial, part of an ever-larger whole. Smolin says, "the new view of the universe is light, in all its senses, because what Darwin has given us, and what we may aspire to generalize to the cosmos as a whole, is a way of thinking about the world which is scientific and mechanistic, but in which the occurrence of novelty – indeed, the perpetual birth of novelty – can be understood."
  3. Other scientists are, to say the least, divided on whether Smolin has much chance of being right, but they agree with Paul Davies that he is "a deep and original thinker."

From Kirkus Reviews
  1. Physics has long assumed that the laws of nature are immutable; here's a cosmological theory that challenges even that common-sense notion.
  2. The great problem facing physics at the end of the 20th century remains the integration of relativity and quantum theory1. While both have scored impressive triumphs in their spheres of concern, the two operate at different poles of the physical universe: Relativity concerns itself with large objects and great distances, whereas quantum theory2 is at home with subatomic particles. And while quantum theory3 has brilliantly accounted for three of the four major forces in the universe, it has failed to make heads or tails of gravity – the one force that affects all the particles in the universe, no matter what the distance between them.
  3. A further difficulty, from Smolin's point of view, is that the ratios of the masses of the known particles do not fall into any coherent pattern, and small changes in those parameters would lead to a universe radically different from ours.
  4. So why is our universe as we see it? Why, for that matter, do we exist at all?
  5. Smolin (Physics/Penn. State Univ.) suggests that an evolutionary principle has been at work, that the Big Bang was only the most recent in a series of creations, and that the laws of physics can vary (although only a tiny bit) with each new bang. Universes that tend to create many stars (and thus many black holes, as those stars die) can give birth to more descendants than those with a paucity of stars. Thus the universe evolves according to a principle similar to natural selection.
  6. Much of the material is fascinating, and Smolin gives the reader a thorough tour of the latest in cosmological speculation. The early chapters are slow going, but once his argument builds up momentum, Smolin is a thought-provoking theorist.

BOOK COMMENT:

See Wikipedia: Lee Smolin.



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