Thinking Clearly About Death
Rosenberg (Jay)
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BOOK ABSTRACT:

Amazon Product Description

  1. Jay Rosenberg's penetrating and persuasively argued analysis of the central metaphysical and moral questions pertaining to death has been updated and revised to expand and deepen several of its key arguments and to address conceptual developments of the past fifteen years.
  2. Among the topics discussed are:
    • Life After Death1;
    • The Limits of Theorizing;
    • The Limits of Imagination;
    • Death and Personhood Values and Rights;
    • 'Mercy Killing';
    • Prolonging Life;
    • 'Rational Suicide' and
    • One's Own Death.
  3. Rosenberg's prose is lucid, lively, thoroughly absorbing, and accessible to introductory-level readers. Essential reading for anyone interested in reflecting on this engaging topic.
  4. Jay F. Rosenberg is Taylor Grandy Professor of Philosophy, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.



"Rosenberg (Jay) - Prefaces & Prelude to Thinking Clearly About Death"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Prefaces
Write-up Note1

See this Note2 for a write-up.



"Silverstein (Harry) - Review of Thinking Clearly About Death by Jay F. Rosenberg"

Source: The Philosophical Review, Vol. 93, No. 3 (Jul., 1984), pp. 492-494


Author’s Introduction
  1. This book, as the author justifiably claims, "constitutes a fairly comprehensive study of those questions about death to which philosophers have traditionally addressed their attentions" (p. xiv).
  2. After a preliminary chapter explaining his sort of philosophy ("'hard-core' analytic philosophy") for the benefit of the book's intended audience (persons with no previous knowledge of academic philosophy), Rosenberg spends about half the book undermining the popular view that "life after death1" is at least a logically coherent possibility, and the second half discussing various moral questions relating to death.
  3. As one might expect, his discussion of "life after death2" is centered in, though it is not limited to, a critique of the popular view's "body and soul" dualism as well as its assumptions regarding personal identity. The "moral" half includes, but is also not limited to, discussions of "mercy killing," "letting die," and "rational suicide."


COMMENT: Review of "Rosenberg (Jay) - Thinking Clearly About Death".



"Rosenberg (Jay) - Some Methodological Preliminaries"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Chapter 0


Contents
  1. Analytic Method in Philosophy — Four Theses – 7
  2. A Motley of Modifiers – 10
  3. Things and "Things" – 13
  4. One Way of Talking Nonsense – 16
  5. A Truth about "Truth" – 20
  6. Retrospect—And What Next? – 24
  7. Appendix – Paraphrase Revisited: More About "Nominal Objects" – 25
    Notes to Chapter 0 – 27


COMMENT: For a write-up, Click here for Note



"Rosenberg (Jay) - 'Life After Death' - In Search of the Question"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Chapter 1


Contents
  1. About Why It Isn't Obvious – 30
  2. Some Other Silly Questions – 32
  3. The End of Life — An Edifying Tale – 34
  4. A Helpful Distinction — And a Sensible Question – 35
  5. Of Life and Death . . . And Other "Opposites"37
  6. What Dies and What We Bury — A Deceptive Idiom – 41
  7. Marking Time: Process, Event, and Instant – 44
  8. The "When" of Death – 47
  9. Changing the Subject — Why Death Isn't Sleep – 48
  10. The Dualistic Pull – 51
  11. Appendix – On Questions about Questions: More about Method – 52
    Notes to Chapter 1 – 55



"Rosenberg (Jay) - Bodies and Souls I - The Limits of Theorizing"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Chapter 2


Contents
  1. A First Try—The 'Having' Theory – 56
  2. Having a Soul — In a Manner of Speaking – 58
  3. A Second Try — The 'Team' Theory – 61
  4. . . . And Try Again – 63
  5. The Banal and the Special – 66
  6. Five Ways to Talk about Bodies – 69
  7. What's Striking about Death – 74
  8. A Very Bad Argument – 76
  9. Beyond "Common Sense" – 78
  10. Being and Doing — How We Resemble Automobiles – 82
  11. The Collapse of a Theory – 86
  12. . . . And an End to Theorizing – 89
  13. Appendix – About "Making Sense" – 91
    Notes to Chapter 2 – 93



"Rosenberg (Jay) - Bodies and Souls II - The Limits of Imagination, Others"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Chapter 3


Contents
  1. An Impassioned Objection – 98
  2. A Bit of Science Fiction – 99
  3. One Picture, Two Stories – 100
  4. A Lesson in Criminology – 103
  5. A Question of Identity – 105
  6. A Visit to the Cinema – 109
  7. Two Forms of Literary Unity – 110
  8. A Decisive Dilemma – 113
  9. "The Glue of Memory" – 114
  10. The Objector Answered – 118
  11. Appendix – Remarks on Some Further Pitfalls – 121
    Notes to Chapter 3 – 125



"Rosenberg (Jay) - Bodies and Souls III - The Limits of Imagination, Oneself"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Chapter 4


Contents
  1. The Objector Not Silenced – 128
  2. More Science Fiction: A Medical Miracle – 129
  3. Why Complicity Matters – 131
  4. Of Persons and Personas – 133
  5. The "Personagraph" — How to Make a New Person – 137
  6. Body Transplants1 — The Limits of Plastic Surgery – 139
  7. The Triumph of Criminology – 144
  8. Closing the Question – 146
  9. Appendix – Personal Identity and the First Person – 149
    Notes to Chapter 4 – 152



"Rosenberg (Jay) - Interlude: An Agenda For Further Discussion"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Interlude



"Rosenberg (Jay) - Death and Personhood: Conceptual Preliminaries"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Chapter 5


Contents
  1. On the Nature of Life and Death – 159
  2. How to Recognize a Corpse – 163
  3. Some Different Kinds of Kinds – 166
  4. Licensed Drivers and Legal Citizens – 168
  5. Contra Aristotle – 173
  6. Human Beings, Rational Entities, and Persons – 176
  7. A Few Fine Points …181
  8. . . . And a Word about Death Certificates185
  9. Appendix – The Primacy of the Organism and the Other End of Life – 188
    Notes to Chapter 5 – 191



"Rosenberg (Jay) - Values and Rights: Moral Preliminaries"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Chapter 6


Contents
    The Project and the Strategy – 193
  1. A Continuum of Competences – 195
  2. Four Kinds of Rights – 197
  3. A Phenomenology of Moral Practice – 199
  4. Two Kinds of Intrinsic Value – 200
  5. Why Life Itself Is Not a Value – 203
  6. Appendix – Our Implicit Moral Theory: Some Misunderstandings – 208
    Notes to Chapter 6 – 212



"Rosenberg (Jay) - 'Mercy Killing' - The Question of Taking Life"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Chapter 7


Contents
  1. The Case of Alric – 216
  2. Facts Are Not the Problem – 219
  3. The Dispute Recast – 221
  4. And the True Question Located223
  5. Two Kinds of Moral Disagreement – 225
  6. How the Balance Can Shift – 228
  7. Appendix – Euthanasia, Capital Punishment, and Abortion – 230
    Notes to Chapter 7 – 233



"Rosenberg (Jay) - 'Letting Die': The Question of Prolonging Life"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Chapter 8


Contents
  1. Sins of Commission and Sins of Omission – 235
  2. Prolonging Life Versus Sustaining Life – 237
  3. In the Matter of Bartholomew – 239
  4. A Crucial Asymmetry – 240
  5. The Dim Echo of Prior Debates – 243
  6. The Morally Right and the Morally Better – 246
  7. On What's Wrong with "Rights" – 249
  8. Some Key Points about Rights Anyway – 250
  9. The Moral Asymmetry of "Mercy Killing" and "Letting Die" – 254
  10. In Which We Enter the Jungle of the Theory of Action – 256
  11. The Ultimate Irrelevance of a Fait Accompli – 261
  12. Appendix – The Case of the Drowned Cousins – 266
    Notes to Chapter 8 – 268



"Rosenberg (Jay) - 'Rational Suicide'"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Chapter 9


Contents
  1. The Case of Darcy – 271
  2. Choices and Attitudes — A Preliminary Survey – 273
  3. The Case for Interfering — And the Case Against It – 275
  4. In Defense of Paternalism – 278
  5. Paternalism and Suicide — Pro and Con – 283
  6. Rationality — The Last Question – 288
  7. Appendix – Self-Deception and the Problematic of Rationality – 293
    Notes to Chapter 9 – 296



"Rosenberg (Jay) - 'Death in the First Person': Expectations and Attitudes"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Chapter 10


Contents
  1. "One's Own Death" – 299
  2. The "Dark Kingdom" of Death – 301
  3. On Imagining One's Own Death – 305
  4. Fear of Death and Fear of Dying – 311
  5. The Perils of Immortality – 315
  6. "Life toward Death" – 319
  7. Loose Ends — And Some Summing Up – 325
  8. Appendix – The "Aloneness" of Death – 329
    Notes to Chapter 10 – 331



"Rosenberg (Jay) - Epilogue: The Limits of Philosophical Understanding"

Source: Rosenberg - Thinking Clearly About Death, 2nd Edn. 1998, Epilogue



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