Modal Logics and Philosophy
Girle (Rod)
This Page provides (where held) the Abstract of the above Book and those of all the Papers contained in it.
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BOOK ABSTRACT:

Back Cover Blurb

  1. Unlike most modal logic1 textbooks which are both forbidding mathematically and short of philosophical discussion ,em>Modal Logics2 and Philosophy places its emphasis firmly on showing how useful modal logic3 can be as a tool for formal philosophy, metaphysics, temporal reasoning, epistemics, the analysis of action and processes, and ethical reasoning. Moving beyond prepositional logic and predicate logic. Rod Girle shows that modal logic4 offers the power to clearly articulate and explore philosophical arguments concerning possibility and necessity, concepts that are essential in our thought and usher in the notion of "possible worlds".
  2. In Part 1 the reader is introduced to some standard systems of modal logic5 and encouraged through a series of exercises to become proficient in manipulating these logics. The emphasis is on possible world semantics for modal logics6 and the semantic emphasis is carried into the formal method, Jeffrey style truth-trees. Standard truth-trees are extended in a simple and transparent way to take possible worlds into account. Part 2 systematically explores the applications of modal logic7 to philosophical issues such as truth, time, processes, knowledge and belief, obligation and permission.
  3. As the first text to combine an introduction to formal modal logic8 with a presentation of its uses as a tool for philosophical analysis Modal Logics9 and Philosophy will be welcomed by non-logic and logic students alike.
  4. Rod Girle: is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Auckland.
  5. "Rod Girle is the best logic teacher that I know. All those who want a non-technical introduction to modal logic10 and its applications, not just Rod's own students, will now be able to benefit from his outstanding pedagogic skills." … Graham Priest, University of Queensland
  6. "Modal Logics11 and Philosophy has the technical precision and rigour that is sometimes sacrificed to concern with philosophical logic. A book that will stand out amongst modal logic12 texts." … Bernard Linsky, University of Alberta

Author’s Preface
  1. This is a Second Level logic text. It introduces students to modal logic13 as an extension of classical first-order logic. The emphasis is on introducing the object language and some of the applications of modal logic14 in philosophy and artificial intelligence15. This text is not intended to be a metatheory text for modal logic16. There are several excellent texts in that area (for example Brian F. Chellas, Modal Logic17: An Introduction (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980) and "Hughes (G.E.) & Cresswell (Max J.) - A New Introduction to Modal Logic" (London: Routledge, 1996). My main focus will be on presenting the logics at an object language level, with a minimum of metatheory. The emphasis will be on the possible worlds semantics. There will be only a brief mention of axiom systems.
  2. The idea is to present the languages of modal logic18 in such a way that the various applications can be sensibly discussed, and arguments containing modal19 terms can be analysed. The aim is to present a relatively small range of logics and then introduce the discussion of alethic, temporal, dynamic, epistemic and deontic applications.
  3. The logical "machinery" that is used is the machinery of semantic tableaux. I assume that students will be familiar with Jeffrey style truth-trees. The approach overall is semantic, with an informal presentation of Kripke style possible worlds semantics. Axiomatic proof systems and natural deduction systems appear in only one chapter.

BOOK COMMENT:
  • Acumen Publishing, Teddington, 2000.
  • I have unfortunately ruined the first chapter and a half by copious annotation, not all of it useful.



"Girle (Rod) - Argument and Modality"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 1
COMMENT: Part 1: Formal Systems



"Girle (Rod) - A Simple Modal Logic"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 2
COMMENT: Introduction



"Girle (Rod) - The Normal Modal Logics"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 3
COMMENT: Part 1: Formal Systems



"Girle (Rod) - Modal Predicate Logics"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 4
COMMENT: Part 1: Formal Systems



"Girle (Rod) - The Non-Normal Modal Logics"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 5
COMMENT: Part 1: Formal Systems



"Girle (Rod) - Natural Deduction and Axiomatics"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 6
COMMENT: Part 1: Formal Systems



"Girle (Rod) - Alethic Modality"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 7
COMMENT: Part 2: Applications



"Girle (Rod) - Temporal Logic"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 8
COMMENT: Part 2: Applications



"Girle (Rod) - Dynamic Logic"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 9
COMMENT: Part 2: Applications



"Girle (Rod) - Epistemic Logic"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 10
COMMENT: Part 2: Applications



"Girle (Rod) - Deontic Logic"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 11
COMMENT: Part 2: Applications



"Girle (Rod) - Synthesis"

Source: Girle - Modal Logics and Philosophy, 2000, Chapter 12
COMMENT: Part 2: Applications



Text Colour Conventions (see disclaimer)
  1. Blue: Text by me; © Theo Todman, 2021
  2. Mauve: Text by correspondent(s) or other author(s); © the author(s)



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