Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle
Everett (Daniel)
This Page provides (where held) the Abstract of the above Book and those of all the Papers contained in it.
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BOOK ABSTRACT:

This is interesting for several reasons:-

  1. The author was a missionary who “lost his faith” as a result of his work1 – I want to find out why.
  2. The author thinks the language of the Pirahas (the Amazonian tribe he spent 30 years on and off living with studying their language) is non-recursive, thereby – he claims – refuting Chomskyan theories of Universal Grammar.
  3. Exotic cultures provide interesting challenges to western views of personhood.

Reviews
  1. 'Dan Everett has written an excellent book. First, it is a very powerful autobiographical account of his stay with the Piraha in the jungles of the Amazon basin. Second, it is a brilliant piece of ethnographical description of life among the Piraha. And third, and perhaps most important in the long run, his data and his conclusions about the language of the Piraha run dead counter to the prevailing orthodoxy in linguistics. If he is right, he will permanently change our conception of human language.'
    John Searle, Slusser Professor of Philosophy, University of California, Berkeley.
  2. 'This is an astonishing book: a work of exploration, into the most distant place and language, but also a revelation of the way language is shaped by thought and circumstance.'
    → Ben Macintyre, The Times.
  3. 'Astonishing... a warm tribute to this people's unique way of seeing the world... full of wonder while conveying the fragility of the Piraha way.'
    Waterstone's Books Quarterly



In-Page Footnotes ("Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle")

Footnote 1:



"Bolyanatz (Alexander H.) - Review of Don't Sleep There Are Snakes, By Daniel Everett"

Source: Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith, Jun2009, Vol. 61 Issue 2, p126-126, 1p

COMMENT: Review of "Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle"



"Everett (Daniel) - Pirahã Culture and Grammar: A Response to Some Criticisms"

Source: Language, Jun2009, Vol. 85 Issue 2, p405-442, 38p


Author’s Abstract
  1. This paper responds to criticisms of the proposals of Everett (2005) by Nevins, Pesetsky, and Rodrigues (2009).
  2. It argues that their criticisms are unfounded and that Pirahã grammar and culture are accurately described in Everett (2005).
  3. The paper also offers more detailed argumentation for the hypothesis that culture can exert an architectonic affect on grammar.
  4. It concludes that Pirahã falsifies the single prediction made by Hauser, Chomsky, and Fitch (2002) that recursion is the essential property of human language.


COMMENT: Related to "Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle".



"Majid (Asifa) & Sutton (Jon) - Adventures in the jungle of language"

Source: Psychologist, Apr2009, Vol. 22 Issue 4, p312-313, 2p

COMMENT: Interview with Daniel Everett re "Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle"



"Papineau (David) - Review of Don't Sleep There Are Snakes, By Daniel Everett"

Source: The Independent Website; Friday, 14 November 2008


Very disappointing review - not much more than a cover blurb. No analysis of the anti-Chomskyan claims.

COMMENT: Review of "Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle"; see Link (Defunct).



"Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life"

Source: Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle


Chapters
    Prologue
  1. Discovering the World of the Pirahas
  2. The Amazon
  3. The Cost of Discipleship
  4. Sometimes You Make Mistakes
  5. Material Culture and the Absence of Ritual
  6. Families and Community
  7. Nature and the Immediacy of Experience
  8. A Teenager Named Tukaaga: Murder and Society
  9. Land to Live Free
  10. Caboclos: Vignettes of Amazonian Brazilian Life


COMMENT: Part 1 (Prologue, Chapters 1 - 10)



"Everett (Daniel) - Changing Channels with Piraha Sounds"

Source: Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

COMMENT: Part 2, Chapter 11



"Everett (Daniel) - Piraha Words"

Source: Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

COMMENT: Part 2, Chapter 12



"Everett (Daniel) - How Much Grammar Do People Need"

Source: Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

COMMENT: Part 2, Chapter 13



"Everett (Daniel) - Values and Talking: The Partnership between Language and Culture"

Source: Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

COMMENT: Part 2, Chapter 14



"Everett (Daniel) - Recursion: Language as a Matrioshka Doll"

Source: Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

COMMENT: Part 2, Chapter 15



"Everett (Daniel) - Crooked Heads and Straight Heads: Perspectives on Language and Truth"

Source: Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

COMMENT: Part 2, Chapter 16



"Everett (Daniel) - Converting the Missionary"

Source: Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

COMMENT: Part 3, Chapter 17



"Everett (Daniel) - Why Care about Other Cultures and Languages"

Source: Everett (Daniel) - Don't Sleep There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

COMMENT: Epilogue



Text Colour Conventions (see disclaimer)
  1. Blue: Text by me; © Theo Todman, 2019
  2. Mauve: Text by correspondent(s) or other author(s); © the author(s)



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