Guns, Germs and Steel: A Short History of Everybody for the Last 13,000 Years
Diamond (Jared)
This Page provides (where held) the Abstract of the above Book and those of all the Papers contained in it.
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BOOK ABSTRACT:

Amazon.co.uk Review

  1. Life isn't fair – here's why: Since 1500, Europeans have, for better and worse, called the tune that the world has danced to.
  2. In Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond explains the reasons why things worked out that way. It is an elemental question, and Diamond is certainly not the first to ask it. However, he performs a singular service by relying on scientific fact rather than specious theories of European genetic superiority.
  3. Diamond, a professor of physiology at UCLA, suggests that the geography of Eurasia was best suited to farming, the domestication of animals and the free flow of information. The more populous cultures that developed as a result had more complex forms of government and communication – and increased resistance to disease.
  4. Finally, fragmented Europe harnessed the power of competitive innovation in ways that China did not. (For example, the Europeans used the Chinese invention of gunpowder to create guns and subjugate the New World.)
  5. Diamond's book is complex and a bit overwhelming. But the thesis he methodically puts forth – examining the "positive feedback loop" of farming, then domestication, then population density, then innovation, and on and on – makes sense.
  6. Written without bias, Guns, Germs, and Steel is good global history.



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