The Origin and the Overcoming of Evil and Suffering in the World Religions
Koslowski (Peter), Ed.
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BOOK ABSTRACT:

Foreword

  1. Evil breaks up the order of the world, but appears nevertheless to belong to it. For the religions of the world, for which the world is based upon order and which regard the world as a consequence of an order established by God or by being, of a dharma, evil and suffering must particularly be a problem. Some have spoken of the riddle or mystery of evil, mysterium iniquitatis. The religions, therefore, cannot be satisfied with considering evil and suffering to be inevitable disruptions of the world.
  2. This second volume of the series A Discourse of the World Religions takes up the question of the origin and nature of evil and suffering, as well as the question of overcoming them, and presents the answers of the five world religions. It documents the second of five EXPO-Discourses, which took place on 17-18 March 2000, shortly before the World Exposition EXPO 2000 held in Hanover, Germany. The theme of the conference was "The Origin and Overcoming of Evil and Suffering in the World Religions." It was convened in the Johannes a Lasco Library Great Church Emden in Emden, East Friesland, Germany. The organizers of the conference were the Hanover Institute of Philosophical Research and the Foundation of Lower Saxony.

Introduction – Abstract
  1. The question of the origin and the overcoming of evil and suffering is one of the fundamental questions of religions. All religions attempt to explain how evil and suffering came into the world and continue to exist.
  2. The philosopher Friedrich Schelling wrote cogently in his Philosophy of Revelation at the middle of the nineteenth century that the concepts of the will and of evil and the belief that the world is transformed distinguish religion and philosophical traditions that have originated under the influence of religion from ancient philosophy, which recognizes neither evil nor the will nor the transformations of the world.
  3. One could extend this idea and say that the emphasis on the significance of the will and of human deeds for the condition of the world, the attempt to speak about evil and suffering and to "cope" with them, and the view that the world, as it is, is not original, but is instead the consequence of transformations caused by evil, represents the characteristic trait of the religions that most distinguishes them from philosophical traditions.

Contents
    Foreword – vii
  1. The Origin and Overcoming of Evil and Suffering in the World Religions: Introduction – 1
    → Peter Koslowski
  2. Evil and the Overcoming of Suffering in Buddhism1 – 8
    → Jae-Ryong Shim
  3. The Fall and the Overcoming of Evil and Suffering in Islam – 24
    → Adnan Aslan – 24
  4. The Origin and Overcoming of Evil: Original Sin and God's Suffering in Christianity – 48
    → Julio Teran Dutari – 48
  5. Discussion of the Origin and Overcoming of Evil and Suffering in Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity – 75
  6. Job and Suffering in Talmudic and Kabbalistic Judaism – 80
    → Oliver Leaman
  7. The Hindu View on Suffering, Rebirth, and the Overcoming of Evil – 100
    → Tanjore Ramachandra Anantharaman
  8. Discussion of the Origin and Overcoming of Evil and Suffering in Judaism and Hinduism – 113
  9. The Propositions of the World Religions about the Origin and Overcoming of Evil: An Attempt at a Synthesis from an Islamic Perspective – 118
    → Adnan Aslan
  10. Summary and Critique from the Perspective of a Christian Theologian – 132
    → Klaus Berger
  11. Concluding Discussion of the Origin and Overcoming of Evil and Suffering in the World Religions – 143
  12. Conversation between the Representatives of the World Religions after the Conclusion of the Public Discourse – 145
  13. Contributors – 150
    Index of Persons – 153

BOOK COMMENT:
  • Springer Science + Business Media, 2001
  • Downloaded during Springer promotion, Dec. 2015



Text Colour Conventions (see disclaimer)
  1. Blue: Text by me; © Theo Todman, 2021
  2. Mauve: Text by correspondent(s) or other author(s); © the author(s)



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