India in the Persianate Age: 1000-1765
Eaton (Richard M.)
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BOOK ABSTRACT:

Notes


Amazon Book Description4
  1. Shortlisted for the 2020 Cundill History Prize.
  2. 'Remarkable ... this brilliant book stands as an important monument to an almost forgotten world'
    William Dalrymple, Spectator
  3. A sweeping, magisterial new history of India from the middle ages to the arrival of the British.
  4. The Indian subcontinent might seem a self-contained world. Protected by vast mountains and seas, it has created its own religions, philosophies and social systems. And yet this ancient land experienced prolonged and intense interaction with the peoples and cultures of East and Southeast Asia, Europe, Africa and, especially, Central Asia and the Iranian plateau between the eleventh and eighteenth centuries.
  5. Richard M. Eaton's wonderful new book tells this extraordinary story with relish and originality. His major theme is the rise of 'Persianate' culture - a many-faceted transregional world informed by a canon of texts that circulated through ever-widening networks across much of Asia. Introduced to India in the eleventh century by dynasties based in eastern Afghanistan, this culture would become thoroughly indigenized by the time of the great Mughals in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. This long-term process of cultural interaction and assimilation is reflected in India's language, literature, cuisine, attire, religion, styles of rulership and warfare, science, art, music, architecture, and more.
  6. The book brilliantly elaborates the complex encounter between India's Sanskrit culture - which continued to flourish and grow throughout this period - and Persian culture, which helped shape the Delhi Sultanate, the Mughal Empire and a host of regional states, and made India what it is today.

Inside Cover Blurb & Back Cover Affidavits
  1. Richard M. Eaton has over a long and varied career published a number of ground-breaking books on India before 1800, including major works on the social roles of Sufis, slavery, Indian biography, the growth of Muslim societies along Bengal’s eastern frontiers, the social history of the Deccan, and the place of Islam in the sub-continent’s history. India in the Persianate Age draws on a lifetime of teaching and research. He is Professor of History at the University of Arizona.
  2. 'This is the epic period in which India was invented. The Hindi language, the biryani and to some extent Hinduism (a Persian word) all come from this Persianate age. By rethinking this history, Eaton breaks free from religious sectarianism ... His book is a fine tribute to India’
    → Tanjil Rashid, The Times
  3. 'A richly researched, badly needed and wholly convincing account’
    John Keay, Literary Review
  4. 'Richard Eaton employs rich empirical detail to demonstrate that intellectual encounters between the Sanskrit and Persian worlds were not tied to any one religion and that the two were not hostile ... and does so with great panache’
    → Rudrangshu Mukherjee, Business Standard
  5. 'Lucid and elegant... a masterful survey written by a leading historian of the medieval and early modern eras of South Asia’
    → Azfar Moin

Contents
    List of Illustrations – ix
    List of Maps – xi
    Acknowledgements – xiii
    Introduction – 3
    → Stereotypes and Challenges – 3
    → Two Transregional Worlds: Sanskrit and Persianate – 10
  1. The Growth of Turkic Power, 1000-1300 – 19
    → A Tale of Two Raids: 1022, 1025 – 19
    → Political Culture in the Sanskrit World – 23
    → Political Culture in the Persianate World – 30
    → The Ghurid Conquest of North India, 1192-1206 – 37
    → The Delhi Sultanate under the Mamluks, or Slave Kings – 45
    → Conclusion – 57
  2. The Diffusion of Sultanate Systems, 1200-1400 – 62
    → Imperial Expansion Across the Vindhyas – 62
    → Settlers, Shaikhs and the Diffusion of Sultanate Institutions – 73
    → The Early Bengal Sultanate – 76
    → Sultanates of the Deccan: the Bahmanis and Vijayanagara – 80
    → The Early Kashmir Sultanate – 88
    → The Decline of the Tughluq Empire – 92
    → Conclusion – 97
  3. Timur’s Invasion and Legacy, 1400-1550 – 100
    → Overview – 100
    → Upper India – 105
    → Bengal – 111
    → Kashmir – 114
    → Gujarat – 119
    → Malwa – 122
    → Emerging Identities: the Idea of ‘Rajput’ – 128
    → Writing in Vernacular Languages – 133
    → Conclusion – 138
  4. The Deccan and the South, 1400-1650 – 142
    → Links to the Persianate World – 142
    → Successors to the Bahmani State – 149
    → Political and Cultural Evolution at Vijayanagara – 157
    → Gunpowder Technology in the Deccan – 167
    → Cultural Production in the Gunpowder Age – 173
    → Vijayanagara’s Successors and South India – 175
    → Conclusion – 190
  5. The Consolidation of Mughal Rule, 1526-1605 – 195
    → Overview – 195
    → Babur – 198
    → Humayun – 206
    → Akbar’s Early Years – 215
    → Emerging Identities: Rajputs – 217
    → Mughal Expansion Under Akbar – 224
    → Akbar’s Religious Ideas – 233
    → Conclusion – 239
  6. India under Jahangir and Shah Jahan, 1605-1658 – 244
    → Jahangir – 244
    → The View from the Frontier – 252
    → The Deccan: Africans and Marathas – 259
    → Emerging Identities: the Idea of ‘Sikh’ – 264
    → Assessing Jahangir – 271
    → Shah Jahan – 273
    → Conclusion – 282
  7. Aurangzeb - from Prince to Emperor ‘Alamgir, 1618-1707 – 288
    → Prince Aurangzeb - Four Vignettes – 288
    → War of Succession, 1657-9 – 301
    → ‘Alamgir’s Early Reign – 309
    → Emerging Identities: the Marathas from Shahji to Tarabai – 314
    → ‘One Pomegranate to Serve a Hundred Sick Men’ – 325
    → Religion and Sovereignty Under ‘Alamgir – 327
    → Conclusion – 338
  8. Eighteenth century Transitions – 340
    → Political Changes, 1707-48 – 340
    → Maratha Uprisings – 350
    → Sikh Uprisings – 355
    → Emerging Identities: Muslims in Bengal and Punjab – 361
    → Early Modern Globalization – 368
    → Conclusion – 377
  9. Conclusion and Epilogue – 380
    → India in the Persianate World – 380
    → The Mughals in the Sanskrit World – 386
    → The Lotus and the Lion – 390
    → Towards Modernity – 393
    Notes – 399
    Index – 461



In-Page Footnotes ("Eaton (Richard M.) - India in the Persianate Age: 1000-1765")

Footnote 1: Footnote 2: Footnote 3: Footnote 4:
BOOK COMMENT:

Penguin (16 July 2020)



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